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Thrombocytopenia is the medical term for a low blood platelet count. Platelets (thrombocytes) are colorless blood cells that play an important role in blood clotting. Platelets stop blood loss by clumping and forming plugs in blood vessel holes.
Thrombocytopenia often occurs as a result of a separate disorder, such as leukemia or an immune system problem, or as a medication side effect. Thrombocytopenia may be mild and cause few signs or symptoms. In rare cases, the number of platelets may be so low that dangerous internal bleeding can occur.

Thrombocytopenia usually improves when the underlying cause is treated. Sometimes medications, surgery or a blood transfusion can help treat chronic thrombocytopenia.

The terms thrombocytopenia and thrombopenia refer to a disorder in which there is a relative decrease of thrombocytes, commonly known as platelets, present in the blood.

A normal human platelet count ranges from 150,000 to 450,000 platelets per microlitre of blood. These limits are determined by the 2.5th lower and upper percentile, so values outside this range do not necessarily indicate disease. One common definition of thrombocytopenia is a platelet count below 50,000 per microlitre.

Many factors can cause a low platelet count, such as:
* The body’s bone marrow doesn’t make enough platelets.
* The bone marrow makes enough platelets, but the body destroys them or uses them up.
* The spleen holds on to too many platelets.

The spleen is an organ that normally stores about one-third of the body’s platelets. It also helps your body fight infection and remove unwanted cell material.

Thrombocytopenia is the medical term for a low blood platelet count. Platelets (thrombocytes) are colorless blood cells that play an important role in blood clotting. Platelets stop blood loss by clumping and forming plugs in blood vessel holes.
Thrombocytopenia often occurs as a result of a separate disorder, such as leukemia or an immune system problem, or as a medication side effect. Thrombocytopenia may be mild and cause few signs or symptoms. In rare cases, the number of platelets may be so low that dangerous internal bleeding can occur.

Thrombocytopenia usually improves when the underlying cause is treated. Sometimes medications, surgery or a blood transfusion can help treat chronic thrombocytopenia.

The terms thrombocytopenia and thrombopenia refer to a disorder in which there is a relative decrease of thrombocytes, commonly known as platelets, present in the blood.

A normal human platelet count ranges from 150,000 to 450,000 platelets per microlitre of blood. These limits are determined by the 2.5th lower and upper percentile, so values outside this range do not necessarily indicate disease. One common definition of thrombocytopenia is a platelet count below 50,000 per microlitre.

Many factors can cause a low platelet count, such as:
* The body’s bone marrow doesn’t make enough platelets.
* The bone marrow makes enough platelets, but the body destroys them or uses them up.
* The spleen holds on to too many platelets.

The spleen is an organ that normally stores about one-third of the body’s platelets. It also helps your body fight infection and remove unwanted cell material.

A combination of the above factors.
How long thrombocytopenia lasts depends on its cause. It can last from days to years.

The treatment for this condition also depends on its cause and severity. Mild thrombocytopenia often doesn’t require treatment. If the condition causes or puts you at risk for serious bleeding, you may need medicines or blood or platelet transfusions. Rarely, the spleen may need to be removed.

Thrombocytopenia can be fatal, especially if the bleeding is severe or occurs in the brain. However, the overall outlook for people who have the condition is good, especially if the cause of the low platelet count is found and treated.
How long thrombocytopenia lasts depends on its cause. It can last from days to years.

The treatment for this condition also depends on its cause and severity. Mild thrombocytopenia often doesn’t require treatment. If the condition causes or puts you at risk for serious bleeding, you may need medicines or blood or platelet transfusions. Rarely, the spleen may need to be removed.

Thrombocytopenia can be fatal, especially if the bleeding is severe or occurs in the brain. However, the overall outlook for people who have the condition is good, especially if the cause of the low platelet count is found and treated.

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